Tag Archives: Chest

The chest is probably the most popular body part for guys when working out. Most men desire a stronger and bigger looking chest.

There are two muscles that make up the chest, the pectoralis major and the pectoralis minor or “pecs” for short. The pectoralis major has two heads, the calvicular and the sternal, is located between the clavicle and the sternum, and is responsible for many movements of the shoulder joint. The pectoralis minor is located underneath the armpits from the third to 5th ribs. Both muscles help to create a chiseled, stronger, and more muscular looking chest.

Terry Crews

Terry Crews: Expendables Workout Plan

Being a former NFL player, Terry Crews is no newbie to the gym. You don’t get this from taking it easy and lifting light. There’s no doubt we can all learn a little something from Terry’s routine.

Monday: Shoulder/Arms/Abs/Cardio

Superset

  1. Upright Barbell Row – 1 set of 6 reps
  2. Power Clean & Jerk – 1 set of 6 reps
  3. Romanian Deadlift – 1 set of 6 rep
  4. Jump Squats – 1 set of 6 reps

Giant Set (4 rounds with 30 seconds between each round)

  1. Alternating Dumbbell Front Lateral Raise – 1 set of 10 reps
  2. Arnold Dumbbell Press – 1 set 10 reps
  3. Lateral Raise – 1 set of 10 reps
  4. Rear Dumbbell Flyes – 1 set of 10 reps
  5. Hammer Dumbbell Curl – 4 sets of 10 reps
  6. Rotator Cuff – 4 sets of 10 reps (30 seconds between each set)

Giant Set (30 seconds between sets)

  1. Crunches – 1 set to failure
  2. Leg Raises – 1 set to failure
  3. Cardio – 30 minutes treadmill at 3.5 miles at 7mph

Tuesday: Back/Cardio

  1. Barbell Deadlift – 4 sets of 10, 8, 6, 4 reps at desired weight (30 second between sets)
  2. Pullups – 3 sets of 10, 8, 6 reps at desired weight (30 seconds between sets)
  3. Behind the Neck Pull-ups – 1 set of 15 reps (30 seconds rest)

Giant Set: Side To Side Chins

  1. Side To Side Chins – 1 set of 6 reps, right. 1 set of 6 reps, left. 1 set of 3 reps, middle
  1. Reverse Barbell Row – 4 sets of 10 reps (30 seconds between sets)
  2. Machine Row – 10, 8, 6, 4 reps at desired weight (30 seconds between sets)
  3. Seated Row – 4 sets of 10 reps (30 seconds between each set)
  4. Cardio – 30 minutes treadmill at 3.5 miles at 7mph

Wednesday: Cardio Day

  1. Treadmill: 45 minutes, 7.0 MPH (5 miles)

Thursday: Chest/Arms/Abs/Cardio

  1. Power Clean & Jerk – 4 sets of 10 reps (30 seconds between each set)
  2. Barbell Bench Press – 4 sets of 10, 8, 6, 4 reps at desired weight (30 seconds between sets)
  3. Incline Barbell Press – 4 sets of 10, 8, 6, 4 reps at desired weight (30 seconds between sets)

Superset (30 seconds between each set)

  1. Dumbbell Flyes – 4 sets of 10 reps
  2. Dumbbell Bicep Curl – 4 sets of 10 reps

Superset (30 seconds between each set)

  1. Dips – Chest Version – 1 set of 15 reps
  2. Pushups – 4 sets of 20 reps

Giant Set (30 seconds between sets)

  1. Crunches – 1 set to failure
  2. Leg Raises – 1 set to failure
  3. Cardio – 30 minutes treadmill at 3.5 miles at 7mph

Friday: Legs/Triceps/Abs/Cardio

  1. Barbell Squat 4 sets of 10, 8, 6, 4 reps at desired weight (30 seconds between each set)

Superset (30 seconds between each set)

  1. Single Leg Leg Press – 4 sets of 10 reps
  2. Calf Raise – 4 sets of 10 reps
  3. Hack Squat – 4 sets of 10 reps (30 seconds between each set)
  4. Close Grip Barbell Bench Press – 4 sets of 10, 8, 6, 4 reps at desired weight (30 seconds between sets)
  5. Leg Extensions – 4 sets of 10 reps (30 seconds between each set)

Giant Set (30 seconds between sets)

  1. Crunches – 1 set to failure
  2. Leg Raises – 1 set to failure
  3. Cardio – 30 minutes treadmill at 3.5 miles at 7mph

Saturday: Cardio Day

  1. Treadmill: 30 minutes at 3.5 miles at 7mph

Sunday: Cardio or Optional Day Off

  1. Treadmill: 30 minutes at 3.5 miles at 7mph or Rest Day (optional)

Decline Bench Press

The decline bench press is widely considered one of the toughest chest exercises due to the body position and the coordination needed to properly execute this exercise. The decline bench press targets the lower region of the chest and provides for an intense workout. This exercise is traditionally performed with a decline bench and an Olympic barbell.

Anatomy

The pectoralis major is located on the front part of the torso between the clavicle and the sternum. This muscle has two heads: the sternal head and the clavicular head. The decline bench press specifically targets the sternal head of the pectoralis major, which is located in the lower portion of the chest near the sternum.

There are several other muscles that play significant roles in the proper execution of the decline bench press. The anterior head of the deltoid, the triceps brachii and the clavicular head of the pectoralis major all assist the sternal head of the pectoralis major in properly executing this exercise movement. The biceps brachii helps to stabilize the elbow joint during this exercise.

Equipment Used

The decline bench press is traditionally performed on a decline bench with an Olympic barbell which weighs 45 pounds and is roughly 7 feet long. The decline bench is typically placed at a 45 to 60 degree angle downward.

There are other pieces of equipment that can be used to provide a variety of challenges with the decline bench press. Pre-loaded bars, dumbbells, and cables can be used to replace the Olympic barbell. A decline press machine can be used instead of a decline bench.

Grips and Hand Placement

The decline bench press is performed with an overhand grip. This means the palms of the hands are facing away from the body and the thumbs are tightly wrapped around the barbell. The hands should be placed at roughly just outside shoulder width apart when first grabbing the barbell.

If the hands are too far apart, the range of motion will be compromised and numerous muscles will no longer participate in the exercise movement. If the hands are place to close to each other, then the exercise will no longer target the pectoralis major but will shift the primary focus to the triceps brachii.

Instructions

  1. To begin, lay flat on a decline bench with feet flat on the ground.
  2. Grab the barbell with an overhand grip, roughly shoulder width apart.
  3. Lift the bar off the rack and slowly lower it to the upper region of the chest.
  4. Lower the bar until the elbows are even with the shoulders. This should form a 90 degree angle in the elbow joint.
  5. Push back upwards until the arms are fully extended without locking the elbows.
  6. Place the barbell on the rack when finished.
  7. Repeat movement for the desired volume of sets and repetitions.

Caution

There are numerous areas of caution for the decline bench press:

  1. Never lift the head off the bench as this can lead to neck strains.
  2. Always keep feet on the ground as this could lead to a loss of balance.
  3. Keep the back flat on the bench unless properly trained otherwise. This can lead to back injuries.
  4. Do not lower the barbell to the chest unless that’s the point where the elbows are even with the shoulders.
  5. Maintain control of the weight at all times.
  6. Do not lock out the elbows as this could lead to joint damage.
  7. Do not bend or curl the wrists as this could lead to joint damage and loss of control.
  8. Use a spotter if lifting heavy or a beginner to this exercise.
  9. Make sure to breathe during the decline bench press. Holding one’s breath could increase chances of light headiness and black outs due to the position of the body.
  10. This exercise is not recommended for those who have issues with light headiness, high blood pressure, headaches or joint problems in the shoulders and elbows.

Incline Bench Press

The incline bench press is a popular variation of the traditional bench press. This exercise targets the chest region, also known as the pectoralis major or “pecs” for short. This exercise traditionally uses a bench that’s elevated to a 45 degree angle and an Olympic barbell.

Anatomy

The pectoralis major is located on the front part of the torso between the clavicle and the rectus abdominus or “abs” for short. This muscle has two heads: the sternal head and the clavicular head. The incline bench press specifically targets the clavicular head of the pectoralis major, which is located by the clavicle.

There are several other muscles that play significant roles in the proper execution of the incline bench press. The anterior head of the deltoid and the triceps brachii assists the pectoralis major in executing the exercise movement. The biceps brachii helps to stabilize the elbow joint during this exercise.

Equipment Used

The incline bench press is traditionally performed on an incline bench with an Olympic barbell which weighs 45 pounds and is roughly 7 feet long. The incline bench is typically placed at a 45 to 60 degree angle.

There are other pieces of equipment that can be used to provide a variety of challenges with the incline bench press. Pre-loaded bars, dumbbells, and cables can be used to replace the Olympic barbell. An incline press machine can be used instead of an incline bench.

Grips and Hand Placement

The incline bench press is performed with an overhand grip. This means the palms of the hands are facing away from the body and the thumbs are tightly wrapped around the barbell. The hands should be placed at roughly just outside shoulder width apart when first grabbing the barbell.

If the hands are too far apart, the range of motion will be compromised and numerous muscles will no longer participate in the exercise movement. If the hands are place to close to each other, then the exercise will no longer target the pectoralis major but will shift the primary focus to the triceps brachii.

Instructions

  1. To begin, lay flat on an incline bench with feet flat on the ground.
  2. Grab the barbell with an overhand grip, roughly shoulder width apart.
  3. Lift the bar off the rack and slowly lower it to the upper region of the chest.
  4. Lower the bar until the elbows are even with the shoulders. This should form a 90 degree angle in the elbow joint.
  5. Push back upwards until the arms are fully extended without locking the elbows.
  6. Place the barbell on the rack when finished.
  7. Repeat movement for the desired volume of sets and repetitions.

Caution

There are numerous areas of caution for the incline bench press:

  1. Never lift the head off the bench as this can lead to neck strains.
  2. Always keep feet on the ground as this could lead to a loss of balance.
  3. Keep the back flat on the bench unless properly trained otherwise. This can lead to back injuries.
  4. Do not lower the barbell to the chest unless that’s the point where the elbows are even with the shoulders.
  5. Maintain control of the weight at all times.
  6. Do not lock out the elbows as this could lead to joint damage.
  7. Do not bend or curl the wrists as this could lead to joint damage and loss of control.
  8. Use a spotter if lifting heavy or a beginner to this exercise.
  9. Make sure to breathe during the incline bench press to prevent any black outs.
  10. This exercise is not recommended for those who have joint problems in the shoulders or elbows.

 

Bench Press

The bench press is a traditional exercise that targets the chest region, formally called the pectoralis major or “pecs” for short. The bench press is also a compound exercise requiring other muscles to participate in the exercise movement.  This exercise is typically performed with a barbell and a flat bench.

Anatomy

The pectoralis major is located on the front part of the torso between the clavicle and the sternum. This muscle has two heads: the clavicular head and the sternal head. The bench press specifically targets the sternal head of the pectoralis major, which is located in the lower portion of the chest near the sternum.

There are several other muscles that play significant roles in the proper execution of the decline bench press. The anterior head of the deltoid, the triceps brachii and the clavicular head of the pectoralis major all assist the sternal head of the pectoralis major in properly executing this exercise movement. The biceps brachii helps to stabilize the elbow joint during this exercise.

Equipment Used

The bench press is traditionally performed on a flat bench with an Olympic barbell which weighs 45 pounds and is roughly 7 feet long. However, there are other pieces of equipment that can be used. Pre-loaded bars, dumbbells, cables can be used to replace the Olympic barbell. An exercise ball or a chest press machine can be used instead of a bench.

Grips and Hand Placement

The bench press is performed with an overhand grip. This means the palms of the hands are facing away from the body and the thumbs are tightly wrapped around the barbell. The hands should be placed at roughly just outside shoulder width apart when first grabbing the barbell.

If the hands are too far apart, the range of motion will be compromised and numerous muscles will no longer participate in the exercise movement. If the hands are place to close to each other, then the exercise will no longer target the pectoralis major but will shift the primary focus to the triceps brachii.

How To Perform A Bench Press

  1. To begin, lay flat on a bench with feet flat on the ground.
  2. Grab the barbell with an overhand grip, roughly shoulder width apart.
  3. Lift the bar off the rack and slowly lower it to the middle of the chest.
  4. Lower the bar until the elbows are even with the shoulders. This should form a 90 degree angle in the elbow joint.
  5. Push back upwards until the arms are fully extended without locking the elbows.
  6. Place the barbell on the rack when finished.
  7. Repeat movement for the desired volume of sets and repetitions.

Caution

There are numerous areas of caution for the bench press:

  1. Never lift the head off the bench as this can lead to neck strains.
  2. Always keep feet on the ground as this could lead to a loss of balance.
  3. Keep the back flat on the bench unless properly trained otherwise. This can lead to back injuries.
  4. Do not lower the barbell to the chest unless that’s the point where the elbows are even with the shoulders.
  5. Maintain control of the weight at all times.
  6. Do not lock out the elbows as this could lead to joint damage.
  7. Do not bend or curl the wrists as this could lead to joint damage and loss of control.
  8. Use a spotter if lifting heavy or a beginner to this exercise.
  9. Make sure to breathe during the bench press to prevent any black outs.
  10. This exercise is not recommended for those who have joint problems in the shoulders or elbows.